Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Some dessert and Eau de Vie

Dessert always seems to be a necessity when in Europe. No matter what country you are in, all restaurants go "all the way" when it comes to desserts. In fact, we have sort of come to a conclusion from our travels. The restaurants all have chefs who take great pride in their menus and the food brought to the table. It might just be us, but we have found that the chefs go totally artistic with their appetizers, a little more low key with the main course and then over the top with the desserts. So, therefore, we always try to eat dessert. We almost always order the fixed prise menu also. You have a choice of several appetizers, a choice of several main plates and then a course of either a cheese course or dessert. Well, come on, unless you are a true Frenchman, you choose dessert!! Right?

Above you see a very delightful tarte tartin with apples and raspberries. Yes, it tasted just as great as it looks. Wonderful with a cup of that dark coffee.

We bought the above dessert in a bakery and brought it home to eat. How beautiful is this? It is absolutely artistic. Cake, a cream filling, black currents and red raspberries. Oh my!! Would you believe we limited ourselves to one and shared this one? Honestly, we did, but it was difficult.

Even though these macarons were not bought in Paris, they were excellent. The Trout and I have a little joke between us. Several years ago, macarons were served with our after dinner coffee. After eating a heavy meal, I was not quite ready to dive into these tasty morsels. He asked me if I wanted them and I said no. He thought I really meant it. I meant, "not right now." In a moment they were gone, but not eaten by me. I sat there in disbelief. Yes, he felt bad, but he said they tasted good. So now, when in France, a few macarons are always purchased as a gift for me.



While staying in the Alsace region of France, we found that Eau de Vie was a very typical drink after dinner. We enjoyed it a lot. We drove to the village of Steige and came across the Nusbaumer distillery making the Eau de Vie. We had a small sample of several and decided to buy an assortment of 8 small bottles. The Quetsch is a very popular one and one of my favorites. Quetsch is the German/French word for plum, specifically the prune plum, the plum prunes are made out of. It was difficult not taking more home, but we were flying, so there are limits.
We have been home now several weeks, but writing this posting today, my heart is still in France, remembering these wonderful meals and especially the desserts.

25 comments:

  1. You macaroon story is so cute! It sounds and looks like you had a great trip.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Honestly, I wanted to grab a fork and enjoy those desserts right along with you! My husband, born in Eastern Europe, loves dessert. He always has dessert with dinner--at home or in a restaurant. Oh how I would love to have his metabolism. He never seems to gain an ounce!

    Best,
    Bonnie

    ReplyDelete
  4. Funny with the macaroons! I can just see that happening! The desserts look delicious, especially that cake!

    ReplyDelete
  5. The apple rasberry dessert looks fantastic. Where do I sigh up?

    ReplyDelete
  6. It was completely innocent on my part that I ate the macaroons!! Schitzel must be more specific in her feelings AND comments!! HA! Geez thought I sold the family jewels!! Men just aren't that doubtful at times I admit but I hope I made it up later! love ya TROUT

    ReplyDelete
  7. Such a beautiful trip and such lovely food! Love the macaron story :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh my, pastries in France are the very best. Laughing at the macaron story. Love macarons.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'd love to know some more details about the layered raspberry dessert...

    ReplyDelete
  10. You are so right. Europe has nailed bakery perfection. The best breads I've ever eaten...I remember in particular a dense vollkorn loaf in south Switz...I only wish I knew how to replicate it.

    ReplyDelete
  11. We are leaving for France Thursday, your post and pics got me excited and HUNGRY!

    ReplyDelete
  12. When I recently did a post of eau de vie, I found it nearly impossible to find a bottle in my area. It is common in Europe, but not in the US. In some of our bigger more cosmopolitan cities you can find it in wine shops, but rarely do you find it on a menu. (I did find a bottle and we love it. I keep it in the freezer.)

    ReplyDelete
  13. Grandma Tillie, I wish I could tell you more about that dessert. A simple cake layered with a creamy mousse filled with fruit and the top is a gelatin fruit topping, very common in Europe.

    Beth R&V, I know how you feel about those wonderful seedy breads. So good.

    Figtree, thanks for visiting. Enjoy your trip and am anxiously awaiting the hear about your cooking school.

    Barbara, I remember your posting about the eau de vie. It is such a treat, but unfortunately, not very popular in the US. (yet)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Normally I'm not a big sweet eater, but who could resist all of these treasures. Eau de vie is hard to find in the states. A shame too because it is delicious. I can sure understand why your heart is still in France. Mine would be too.
    Sam

    ReplyDelete
  15. Susan I can totally understand why your heart is still in France! These colorful desserts look amazing!! So glad you captures photos of them to remember.

    Are you coming a bit later this year to MT? Late July...are you staying until the end of September? Hope so!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Ha, loved Trout's comment, sure Trout that's what all husbands say!! LOL

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Susan,
    I had to come back to read your lovely stories. Those pictures look fantastic;I can almost taste that tarte tatin; merci!
    Rita

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have throughly enjoyed your European blog posts. I see the macarons all over the food blogs but, have yet to try one. In France, I will.
    We will be heading to France next week. Our mode of transportation is a bicycle (laugh). I am hoping that I will be able to describe my journey as well as you have been able too- Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I think most French desserts are works of art, especially the ones you see in the windows of patisseries. They look like jewelry sometimes, so perfect and colorful.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I think i am in a kaniption fit of covetousness.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Oh my, those desserts look just wonderful ! I must admit that is always my favourite part of the meal - dessert ;) Looks like you had a wonderful time ....

    ReplyDelete
  22. When on holiday dessert is always something we indulge in. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  23. It's torture looking at all these amazing desserts...

    ReplyDelete
  24. Next time try to travel to Provence - we have a Pâtisserie in Vaison la Romaine that makes the most sinfully delicious macarons ever!

    ReplyDelete
  25. I haven't tried Quetsch and have asked Nick to see if our Alsace negotiant can ship us some with the next batch of Cremant d'Alsace! Thanks for the discovery!

    ReplyDelete