Saturday, June 26, 2010

Salade Lyonnaise


The Trout found a great recipe in the New York Times and tonight was the night to try it. Unfortunately, to find frisee lettuce in central Florida is kind of a challenge. We did see some at Whole Foods in Tampa, but it was $2.99 for a very small bunch and we would have needed at least three for this salad. So, we kept searching. I am very frugal.


Thought Arugula would work fine, but settled for an endive. It turned out alright, but Arugula would probably have been the better choice. So, let me tell you what we did.


Salade Lyonnaise


4 cups of torn frisee or other strong tasting greens, washed and dried

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

about 1/2 pound good slab bacon or pancetta, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

1 shallot, chopped or 1 tablespoon chopped red onion

2 to 4 tablespoons top-quality sherry vinegar

1 tablespoons Dijon mustard

Salt

4 eggs

Freshly ground pepper


1. Put frisee or other greens in a large salad bowl. Put olive oil in skillet over medium heat. When hot, add bacon and cook slowly until crisp all over, about 10 minutes. Add shallot or onion and cook until softened, a minute or two. Add vinegar and mustard to the skillet and bring just to a boil, stirring, then turn off the heat.


2. Meanwhile, bring an inch of salted water to a boil in a small, deep skillet, then lower heat to barely bubbling. One at a time, break eggs into a shallow bowl and slip them into the bubbling water. Cook eggs for 3 to 5 minutes, just until the white is set and the yolk has filmed over. Remove each egg with a slotted spoon and drain briefly on paper towel.


3. If necessary, gently reheat dressing, then pour over greens. They should wilt just a bit. Toss and season to taste. Top each portion with an egg and serve immediately. Each person gets to break the egg.


This was a lovely light summer dinner. We did serve it along side a crab cake. I did not make the crab cake. It was purchased at Costco, Phillips brand, and we really like them a lot.

14 comments:

  1. This looks really yummy and the egg is cooked to perfection. Diane

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  2. That sound so good and your photo is fantastic!
    Rita

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  3. It looks delicious and is a great thing for a summer supper. Perfect with crab cakes!

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  4. Great summer food! I understand it's not easy to succeed cooking the egg .. your looks perfect!

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  5. Our favorite French restaurant serves a similar salad that I love! That looks so good!

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  6. Oh Yummmmmm!!! I'm starving, haven't had lunch yet....wish I could just reach through your photo and munch down!!!

    :)

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  7. Our farmers' market have beautiful frisse yesterday--large "head" for a dollar. I purchased two because I love the way it looks in a salad (and the taste too). Now I can use it in your recipe. Yum!

    Best,
    Bonnie

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  8. A beautifully poached egg works magic on a simple dish. I will love this, Susan. And thanks for the tip about the crab cakes. We love them and I can't always find fresh crab.

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  9. This is one of my favorite French-style salads. Yours looks wonderful and that egg takes it to another level. I make mine with sausage, but I really like the way yours sounds. I'll have to give it a try. I hope all is well. Blessings...Mary

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  10. Thanks for all your comments. This salad was even fun!! Cathy, the crab cakes from Costco are full of big chunks of crab. It is the best store bought brand we have found. I mean, if you don't have Pacific NW crab just outside your door, you do what you have to do. ;-)

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  11. I love eggs and I love salad. I've never tried egg on my salad (except hard boiled with Cobb salad). It looks wonderful! ;)

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  12. That poached egg looks perfect. Thanks for your prayers.

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  13. good timing.. a must try for our guests from canada !!

    blessings
    gp

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  14. Susan, I really love your salad, especially because of the sherry vinegar. I think it makes all of the difference in the world in a vinaigrette.
    Sam

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